Signs That Your Home May Need Mold Remediation

Mold Remediation Resource

Nobody wants to discover mold growth in their home. In addition to the musty odor and the unsightly appearance, mold can contribute to health effects and structural damage to our property. Yet we’ve found many property owners have misconceptions about mold and how it should be treated.

learned what property owners need and want to know about mold and the remediation process. That’s why we’ve put together this resource page to help you find the information you need!

The process for mold remediation—like any other restoration service—can vary depending on the extent of the mold’s growth. Regardless, it’s a good idea to be familiar with the general process so you have a better understanding of what will need to happen at your property.

Understandably, most homeowners have a lot of questions about mold. Having heard many of them over the past 10 years, we’ve dedicated our blog to answering some of your most burning questions. Below you’ll find a list of some of our most popular mold-related blog posts.

Mold spores are everywhere—both in and out of your home. These spores aren’t often an issue, however, until they come into contact with moisture and begin to grow into colonies. Once this growth occurs, the colonies produce more spores and begin to consume the organic surfaces they reside on. Because moisture is essential for this growth, there are several places that commonly have mold growth.

Window Sills. You’ve probably seen it before—moisture on your windows. As a result of condensation, water often collects along windows and drips down to the window sill. Unless this is addressed or dried consistently, it opens the opportunity for mold growth to occur.

Bathtubs. Bathtubs are one of the most common places to find mold. Water—logically—is ever present, and when bathrooms are not well-ventilated, the moisture does not escape, which gives mold exactly what it needs.

Location of Recent Water Damage. Water damages can occur to anyone—pipes burst, water heaters leak, toilets overflow, etc. But unless these damages are quickly addressed and properly handled, they can encourage mold growth.

What is Microbial Contamination?

What is Microbial Contamination? Where does mold come from? Is microbial contamination a health concern issue? How do you properly get rid of a microbial contamination?

Microbial contamination refers to a variety of microorganisms, including mold, bacteria, viruses and protozoa; and fungi, which includes molds, yeasts, and their by products and toxins. All of these can affect the health of a building and its occupants.

As a starting point the proper job sequencing for a typical microbial-remediation project includes but it not limited to: identifying and stopping the source of moisture; setting up containment; establishing negative air; removing contaminated building materials; cleaning surfaces; drying the affected areas; conducting a post remediation evaluation.

Never use a DIY mold test, Heres why!

If you look on the internet, there are scores of DIY mold test kits. Before you invest in one of these kits, here are things you ought to know about mold:

Mold is everywhere and every single house has some form of “mold.”

Most self-test mold kits only tell you if your home has mold, but often provides false negatives and positives. It also does not tell you what kind of mold or how to kill it.

A true mold test can only be conducted by a Professional Environmental testing company; they determine the type of mold, the source of the moisture, and how to kill the mold at the core. They create a protocol, which can be read by an IICRC professional (like us!).  It’s best to use a testing company that does not do cleaning themselves because their assessment will be unbiased.

Is Your Mold Damage Covered?

A pipe bursts in your home, so you call a plumber and water restoration experts to fix the damage. Before they arrive, however, you start to notice a musty odor near the affected area and you see mold growth on a nearby wall. Mold can start to grow in as little as 24 hours after water damage has occurred. One question you probably have is whether or not your homeowner’s insurance will cover the cost of the remediation. The answer depends on a couple of factors.

Covered Peril

The first thing your insurance provider may want to determine is the cause of the mold damage. Many basic policies cover the cost of mold mitigation if the issue is related to a covered peril:

Recent pipe break or leak

Overflowing toilet

Broken appliance

Roof leak

With most homeowner’s coverage, there are two elements that determine whether an event constitutes a covered peril. Did it happen suddenly, and was it an accident? If those two conditions exist, it is likely that not only the initial water damage but also any related secondary damage such as mold growth will be covered by your provider. If, however, the damage occurs as a result of an ongoing problem or your negligence, you will probably have to pay for the repairs out of pocket.

Policy Additions

Some policies spell out limited coverage for mold damage explicitly. Many insurance providers offer separate mold insurance to supplement the general homeowner’s policy. This coverage is called an endorsement, and there is an additional fee to add this particular protection. Your agent can advise you on the best coverage for your home and let you know what options are available to you.

Understanding Mold Coverage for Renters

When you live in a house or apartment you don’t own, it is advisable to purchase a good rental insurance policy. That way, if your belongings are harmed or destroyed, you can get help paying for them to be replaced. Does your policy cover mold damage, though? The answer to this question depends on a couple of factors

Causes of Mold in Your Home and How to Prevent It

The last thing you want is a house full of mold. But you can’t stop it. No matter how clean you keep your home, it will always contain invisible mold spores. Disinfectant can only do so much because these tiny fungi seeds are an ever-present part of nature’s recycling system. And they fulfill a necessary, vital part in decomposing organic material.

It’s when fungi spore cultures become colonies of slimy, dark mold that things get messy. They get dangerous as well. Intolerance to pathogenic mycotoxins that mold cultures emit causes serious health problems for many people. For some, it can be a permanent disability or even premature death.

While it’s impossible to entirely eradicate the presence of microscopic mold spores from your house, you certainly can prevent mold in your home. The key is controlling moisture. Much of mold troubles come from simple and slow plumbing leaks. But there’s far more to knowing how to prevent mold damage than calling a plumber.

A plumber is an excellent professional resource who can fix a relatively small water leak before it turns into a giant mold problem. Plumbers are also trained to spot the telltale signs of hidden mold issues and alert you to potential disasters. A plumber’s experience is invaluable as part of mold identification. They can also be priceless in helping with mold prevention.

The first part of knowing how to prevent mold in homes is knowing the causes. Then it’s helpful to know the ramifications of letting a small area of mold contamination spread into a huge and expensive infestation. Learning what mold is, its causes and how to properly clean moldy surfaces should be part of your home-owning education — so should watching for potential mold trouble spots. You also need to know mold’s health hazard symptoms, the safety precautions in handling moldy materials, and your insurance policy implications when it comes to mold damage claims

Mold Removal

Mold that are considered harmful to humans are considered “Toxic Molds”. It is not just one type of mold. “Black Mold”. There are hundreds of molds that are toxic and deadly to humans, only a small fraction of which are not deadly to humans.

Black Molds are considered as the deadliest molds, however molds of other colors are as deadly. Moist dark places are a breeding ground for mold. Mold can also grow on most any organic surface. Moisture and oxygen at the things needed to feed and grow mold.

Five Categories of “Toxic Mold” :

-Cladosporium

-Penicillium

-Fusarium

-Aspergillus

-Stachybotrys

Some of these only have the effect of allergy like symptoms that mimic hay fever. Other however can cause medical problems that are considered potentially deadly. All five of these molds can be found indoors anywhere there is dampness.

UV Light is provided by the sun and also by specially designed lamps. The three types of UV lamps in the market produce UV-A, UV-B and UV-C light. UV-B is used in medical applications to treat patients with Jaundice, Psoriasis, and other skin disorders by irradiating the reactor pads and in rooms to treat the upper level air next to the ceiling. UV-A is less effective in killing bacteria than UV-C. UV-C at 254 nm wavelength is the peak absorbance of DNA and RNA; therefore, the most effective in killing cells, including bacteria. UV light intensity decreases with the square of the distance from the bulb. Therefore, for UV-light to be effective, bacteria and mold cells must be in close proximity to the lamp.